Journey of a Meme: Culture Jamming & Elections

Meme is the basic unit of culture jamming – an idea that utilizes the conventions of mainstream media to disrupt, subvert and plays upon the emotions of political bystanders so as to evoke change and activism.

On Oct 11 2018, the hashtag #JobsNotMobs came into being anchored by a ‘supercut’ viral video of cable news’ use of the word ‘mob’ juxtaposed with footage of various protests that happened last year. This meme slowly made its way through the crevices of social media across 4chan, reddit, facebook and twitter into President Trump’s twitter feed. 

Keith Collins and Kevin Roose in their NY times article, 

visualize the birth and spread of #JobsNotMobs and how it rapidly became part of the Republican campaign narrative in the midterm elections. 

The creator of the meme, who goes by the pen name “Bryan Machiavelli,” told The New York Times he charges $200 an hour for his “memetic warfare consulting” services.

Check out the visualization here.

Inside – Bruno Latour’s Gaiagraphic View

As part of the ‘French Natures’ conference-festival hosted by NYU, Bruno Latour’s awaited piece ‘Inside’ premiered in the US last week on Friday at The Romulus Linney Courtyard Theatre in New York City . A 60 minute long lecture-performance which has toured across several cities in Europe, Latour calls it a theatrical thought experiment. Directed by Frédérique Aït-Touati, his long time collaborator in research and theater work, ‘Inside’ asks one of the most pertinent question of our times –

how we can rethink our relationship to the planet in times of environmental catastrophe.

Humans have long thought they walk on a globe, on the Globe. But in recent years, geochemists have shown us a completely different planet, by turning attention to the “critical zone,” this thin surface film of Earth where water, soil, subsoil and the world of living beings interact. If this area is critical, it is because life, human activities, and their resources are concentrated there. – French Natures

A version of the performance filmed in February 2018 in Frankfurt, Germany

The production of ‘Inside’ Latour saysoffers alternative visualizations  which allows to shift from a planetary vision of places located in the geographic grid, to a representation of events located in what we call a Gaiagraphic view.’

In her New York Times portrait on Latour’s work, Ava Kofman speaks to his post-truth philosophy:

In our current environmental crisis, he continued, a new image of the earth is needed — one that recognizes that there is no such thing as a view from nowhere and that we are always implicated in the creation of our view.

Learn more about Inside’s Premiere here.

Local Data Design: An Interview with Professor Yanni Loukissas

Dr. Anne Luther spoke with Professor Yanni Loukissas by phone to discuss his research focus on critical data studies and local readings of data collections. Yanni Loukissas is an assistant professor of digital media in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication at Georgia Tech, where he directs the Local Data Design Lab. He teaches courses in Digital Media, Computational Media, Human-Computer Interaction, and Science, Technology, and Society.

Continue reading “Local Data Design: An Interview with Professor Yanni Loukissas”

The Trouble With Election Maps

The election map in the New York Times was the subject of plenty of conversations in the data visualization and cartography world yesterday. As much as we here at CDA love a good conversation about visual representation (and apparently, we like to do it in rhyme), this map did raise a lot of questions and concerns. In a post for CityLab, Andrew Small writes: “America needs a voting map that actually looks like America.”

Small continues:

But as people tee up to argue and theorize about what the electoral map means for the country, I’m reminded of a recent point of wisdom my colleague Laura Bliss made recently—maps aren’t facts, they’re starting points.

Read Small’s full post for his thoughts on where we can start.